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Past Events

IPR organizes a variety of events across the year, including distinguished lectures, policy research briefings, and its signature Monday colloquium series. Recordings and materials for some previous IPR events can also be found below.
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Event Type Research Areas Year Multimedia
July 10, 2020

Chicago Area Behavior Workshop

2020 Chicago Area social and political Behavior (CAB) Workshop - Schedule

10:55 - 11:00 a.m. - "Welcome" by James Druckman, Northwestern University and IPR 

11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. - “Will COVID-19 Impact Political Engagement?” by Beth Redbird, Northwestern University and IPR 

12:15-1:00 p.m. - Virtual Mentoring Lunch

1:15-2:15 p.m. - "Reactions to Information About Racial Disparities in COVID-19,” by LaFleur Stephens-Dougan, Princeton University

2:30-3:30 p.m. - Discussion Panel: Working in a Changed Environment and Workplace
Katherine Cramer, University of Wisconsin-Madison
David Peterson, Iowa State University
Thomas Rudolph, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
Alvin Tillery, Northwestern University
Christina Wolbrecht, University of Notre Dame

The presentations and panel will be in a Zoom webinar format, and registration is required. You will need to create a Zoom account if you do not have one already to register.

Sponsored by: The 2020 Chicago Area Behavior Workshop is sponsored by Northwestern’s Political Science Department, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, and Institute for Policy Research.

Workshops and Training Politics, Institutions and Public Policy 2020
June 1, 2020

Managing Two Epidemics: How Street Outreach Workers Are Addressing Gun Violence and COVID-19

 Andrew Papachristos, Professor of Sociology, IPR Fellow, and Director of the Northwestern Neighborhood and Networks (N3) Lab
Colloquium Urban Policy and Community Development 2020
May 18, 2020

Researching Adolescent Stress in the Time of COVID-19

Emma Adam, Edwina S. Tarry Professor of Human Development and Social Policy and IPR Fellow
Colloquium Social Disparities and Health; Child, Adolescent and Family Studies 2020
May 11, 2020

Disease Spread and Human Capital

Hannes Schwandt, Assistant Professor of Human Development and Social Policy and IPR Fellow

The Spring 2020 IPR Monday Fay Lomax Cook (FLC) Colloquium Series will be held online using Zoom. 

Northwestern faculty, staff, and students: Please be sure to log into Zoom on your desktop (not the browser) using your authenticated Northwestern netid and password (Sign In with SSO). This will allow you to enter the colloquium around 11:50 a.m. CDT. 

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No Northwestern netid? External participants are required to register for this colloquium here and cannot join without having registered by 10:00 a.m. CDT on Monday, May 11. If you have already registered for this or other IPR talks, you do not need to do so again.

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Please make sure that you are running the latest version of Zoom.

Colloquium Education Policy 2020
May 4, 2020

Surveying the Social and Cultural Impact of COVID-19

Beth Redbird, Assistant Professor of Sociology and IPR Fellow

The Spring 2020 IPR Monday Fay Lomax Cook (FLC) Colloquium Series will be held online using Zoom. 

Northwestern faculty, staff, and students: Please be sure to log into Zoom using your authenticated Northwestern netid and password (Sign In with SSO). This will allow you to enter the colloquium directly at 11:50 a.m. CDT. 

If you are signed in as a guest or on a personal account, this might cause delays in admitting you to the colloquium.
__________________________________________________________

No Northwestern netid? External participants are required to register for this colloquium here and cannot join without having registered by 10:00 a.m. CDT on Monday, May 4. If you have already registered for this or other IPR talks, you do not need to do so again.

To avoid delays in admitting you to the colloquium, please be sure to use the same first name and last name that you used to register when you join the colloquium in Zoom.
__________________________________________________________

Please make sure that you are running the latest version of Zoom.

See the video of Beth Redbird's talk.

Available Multimedia: Video
Colloquium Politics, Institutions and Public Policy 2020 Video
April 27, 2020

The Impact of COVID-19 on Gender Equality

 Matthias Doepke, HSBC Research Professor of Economics and IPR Associate

The Spring 2020 IPR Monday Fay Lomax Cook (FLC) Colloquium Series will be held online using Zoom. 

Northwestern faculty, staff, and students: Please be sure to log into Zoom using your authenticated Northwestern netid and password (Sign In with SSO). This will allow you to enter the colloquium directly at 11:50 a.m. CDT. 

If you are signed in as a guest or on a personal account, this might cause delays in admitting you to the colloquium.
__________________________________________________________

No Northwestern netid? External participants are required to register for this colloquium here and cannot join without having registered by 10:00 a.m. CDT on Monday, April 20. If you have already registered for this or other IPR talks, you do not need to do so again.

To avoid delays in admitting you to the colloquium, please be sure to use the same first name and last name that you used to register when you join the colloquium in Zoom.
__________________________________________________________

Please make sure that you are running the latest version of Zoom.

Available Multimedia: Video
Colloquium Poverty, Race and Inequality; Politics, Institutions and Public Policy 2020 Video
April 20, 2020

COVID-19 and Public Policy Responses by Government: Key Emerging Legal Issues

Daniel B. Rodriguez, Harold Washington Professor of Law and IPR Associate

The Spring 2020 IPR Monday Fay Lomax Cook (FLC) Colloquium Series will be held online using Zoom. 

Northwestern faculty, staff, and students: Please be sure to log into Zoom using your authenticated Northwestern netid and password (Sign In with SSO). This will allow you to enter the colloquium directly at 11:50 a.m. CDT. 

If you are signed in as a guest or on a personal account, this might cause delays in admitting you to the colloquium.

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

No Northwestern netid? External participants are required to register for this colloquium here and cannot join without having registered by 10:00 a.m. CDT on Monday, April 20. If you have already registered for this or other IPR talks, you do not need to do so again.

To avoid delays in admitting you to the colloquium, please be sure to use the same first name and last name that you used to register when you join the colloquium in Zoom.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Please make sure that you are running the latest version of Zoom.

Available Multimedia: Video
Colloquium Politics, Institutions and Public Policy 2020 Video
April 13, 2020

Estimating the COVID-19 Infection Rate: Anatomy of an Inference Problem

Charles F. Manski, Board of Trustees Professor of Economics and IPR Fellow

Available Multimedia: Video Transcript
Colloquium Social Disparities and Health; Performance Measurement and Rewards 2020 Video; Transcript
March 9, 2020

The Economic Consequences of Bankruptcy Reform

"The Economic Consequences of Bankruptcy Reform"

by Matthew Notowidigdo, Associate Professor of Economics and IPR Faculty Fellow

Abstract: A more generous consumer bankruptcy system provides greater insurance against financial risks, but it may also raise the cost of credit to consumers. We study this trade-off using the 2005 Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (BAPCPA), which raised the costs of filing for bankruptcy. We identify the effects of BAPCPA on borrowing costs by exploiting variation in the effects of the reform on bankruptcy risk across credit-score segments. Using a combination of administrative records, credit reports, and proprietary market-research data, we find that the reform reduced bankruptcy filings, and reduced the likelihood that an uninsured hospitalization received bankruptcy relief by 70 percent. BAPCPA led to a decrease in credit card interest rates, with an implied pass-through rate of 60–75 percent. Overall, BAPCPA decreased the gap in offered interest rates between prime and subprime consumers by roughly 10 percent.

 

Colloquium 2020
March 2, 2020

Operationalizing Research to Improve Health Inequities: The Collective Power of One Northwestern

Operationalizing Research to Improve Health Inequities: The Collective Power of One Northwestern

by Melissa Simon, George H. Gardner, MD, Professor of Clinical Gynecology, Vice Chair for Clinical Research, and
IPR Associate

In this talk, Simon will discuss some basics on the current state of health equity and pull in her own body of work in Chicago that intersects scientific rigor with policy creation and community partnership and action. Simon will discuss how we as an entire University can leverage the depth and breadth of talent to scale impact on improving health equity via better integrating and operationalizing our collective scholarship.

 

Colloquium 2020
February 26, 2020

Special Lecture - The Greatest Anti-Poverty Success Story I Know

Jason DeParle, New York Times reporter and author of "A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st Century"

New York Times reporter Jason DeParle met 40-year-old Tita Comodas in 1987 when she welcomed him into her home in Leveriza, a Manila shantytown. Eight months of sleeping on her floor turned into a lifelong friendship. DeParle went on to trace the family’s economic and social trajectory over three generations —and with it, the rise of global migration. During that time, nine of Tita’s 11 siblings and 24 of her 41 nieces and nephews left the Philippines to work abroad. Rosalie, Tita’s second daughter and a nurse, eventually achieves her most cherished dream—one held by many—of emigrating to the United States with her family. In his latest book, A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves, DeParle recounts the family’s fortunes—and misfortunes—within the larger contexts of global migration and U.S. immigration policy. He follows, and celebrates, Rosalie and her family as they climb out of Manila’s “shantytown poverty” and into Galveston’s suburban middle class. In doing so, he captures their immense sacrifices and the remarkable benefits of immigration and assimilation to both the newly arrived and the nation itself.

Special Event Poverty, Race and Inequality 2020
February 24, 2020

Measuring the World’s Experiences with Water: Implications for Science, Policy and... Northwestern

Sera Young, Associate Professor of Anthropology and IPR Fellow

Abstract: Problems with water quality and quantity are increasing in frequency and severity throughout the world, including in the United States. High-resolution, globally comparable data have been extremely helpful for understanding the human health impact of other health issues, e.g., food insecurity, but have not existed for water. To fill this gap, Young led the development of the Household Water Insecurity Experiences (HWISE) scale, the first cross-culturally equivalent way of measuring water access and use (hwise.org). The HWISE Scale can be used to estimate prevalence of household water insecurity and to investigate its causes and consequences. The HWISE Scale is currently being implemented globally, including by the Gallup World Poll, to benchmark water access and use. Her presentation will conclude by discussing the policy implications of these data for both Northwestern University and the global community.

Colloquium 2020
February 21, 2020

Gerrymandering: What Is It, How Can We Measure It, and What Can We Do About It?

Jeanne Clelland, Professor of Mathematics, University of Colorado-Boulder

Abstract: Gerrymandering refers to the practice of drawing legislative districts so that one political party wins a disproportionate number of seats relative to their share of the electorate. But how can we tell whether or not districts have been drawn fairly? This is a legal question and, increasingly, a mathematical one, but the mathematical tools used to measure gerrymandering are relatively new and are still evolving rapidly. One promising approach involves using computational and statistical tools to compare a specific districting plan to an “ensemble” consisting of a large number of potential districting plans. This approach, referred to as “outlier analysis,” has the advantage of taking into account the inherent political geography of a region in a way that simpler measures cannot, and it has already begun to play a role in major court cases regarding redistricting in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere. In this talk, Clelland will describe how gerrymandering works and some of the mathematical tools that are being developed to detect it, with a focus on outlier analysis. She will also talk about an ongoing effort to collect data and perform this type of analysis for as many states as possible in advance of the next round of congressional redistricting in 2021.

Colloquium Social Disparities and Health 2020
February 17, 2020

What’s Anger Got to Do with It? Limits to Consumer and Employee Mobilization

Brayden King, Max McGraw Chair of Management and the Environment, Professor of Management and Organizations, Kellogg, and IPR Associate

 Abstract: Theories about social movements assert that the mobilization of “reference publics”—such as consumers or employees—is a necessary condition for generating movement-led social change. These publics are thought to be activated by emotional triggers, such as anger. The studies in this presentation question this assumption. One set of studies examines whether boycotts actually change consumers’ behavior, and another set of studies assesses whether anger motivates employees to support movements in their workplace. King and his co-authors conclude that the mechanisms that explain the mass mobilization of movements may be ineffective in generating the support of reference publics such as consumers and employees.

Colloquium 2020
February 10, 2020

Who Are the Game Changers? Why We Need to Study Leadership in Adolescence

Jennifer Tackett, Professor of Psychology and IPR Associate
Colloquium 2020
February 5, 2020

STEPP Colloquium - Publication Biases in Replication Studies

James Druckman, Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science and IPR Associate Director and IPR Fellow
Colloquium Quantitative Methods for Policy Research 2020
February 3, 2020

Are Earthquake-Shaking Forecasts Good Enough to Rely on for Planning and Policy?

Bruce Spencer, Professor of Statistics and IPR Fellow; Seth Stein, William Deering Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Leah Saldith and James Neely, IPR Graduate Research Assistants, Earth and Planetary Sciences
Colloquium 2020
January 29, 2020

IPR/CNAIR Colloquium - What Drives Native American Poverty?

Beth Redbird, Assistant Professor of Sociology; IPR Fellow; and CNAIR Fellow (2019-20)
Colloquium Social Disparities and Health; Poverty, Race and Inequality 2020
January 27, 2020

The Economics of Parenting with Neighborhood and Peer Effects

Matthias Doepke, HSBC Research Professor of Economics and IPR Associate

 

Colloquium 2020
Colloquium Quantitative Methods for Policy Research 2020
Colloquium 2020
January 6, 2020

How Institutions and Social Identity Affect Policy Change: The Case of College Sports

by James Druckman, Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science and IPR Fellow and Associate Director
Colloquium Politics, Institutions and Public Policy 2020
November 25, 2019

The Role of Campaign Promises in Voter Decision Making

by Tabitha Bonilla, Assistant Professor of Human Development and Social Policy and IPR Fellow
Colloquium 2019
November 21, 2019

Janet Currie: Child Health as Human Capital

by Janet Currie, Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and Co-Director of Princeton's Center for Health and Wellbeing

Public Policy Lecture Education Policy 2019
November 20, 2019

How Do School Districts Use Evidence? A Discussion With Paul Goren and Cynthia Coburn

by Paul Goren, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University and Cynthia Coburn, Professor of Human Development and Social Policy Learning Sciences
Colloquium 2019
November 18, 2019

'It’s the Guys that Determine That': Feminism and Sorority Ranking at Central U.

by Simone Ispa-Landa, Associate Professor of Human Development and Social Policy and IPR Fellow

Colloquium 2019
November 11, 2019

The Violent Bias in the Study of Civil War

by Ana Arjona, Associate Professor, Political Science and IPR Faculty Associate
Colloquium 2019
November 4, 2019

Challenges and Opportunities at the Interface of the Biological and Social Sciences

by Thomas McDade, Carlos Montezuma Professor of Anthropology, IPR Fellow, and Director of IPR's Cells to Society (C2S): The Center on Social Disparities and Health
Colloquium 2019
October 30, 2019

Designing Research to Maximize Impact on Policy Decisions and on Practice

by Ronald Ackermann, Senior Associate, Dean for Public Health: Director, Institute for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM); Professor of Medicine and Medical Social Sciences; and IPR Associate
Colloquium 2019
October 28, 2019

Beyond Detention: Key Findings from the Northwestern Juvenile Project

by Linda Teplin, Vice Chair for Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Owen L. Coon Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and IPR Faculty Associate
Colloquium 2019
October 23, 2019

“Empowering Electoral Reform: Quantifying Gerrymandering via Multi-Objective Optimization and Statistical Models”

by Wendy Tam Cho, Professor of Political Science, Statistics, Mathematics, Asian American Studies, and Law, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Colloquium 2019
October 21, 2019

Race in the Machine

by Quincy Stewart, Associate Professor of Sociology and IPR Faculty Fellow
Colloquium 2019
October 14, 2019

The Impact of Car Pollution on Infant and Child Health: Evidence from Emissions Cheating

by Hannes Schwandt, Assistant Professor of Human Development and Social Policy and IPR Faculty Fellow.
Colloquium 2019
Colloquium 2019
October 7, 2019

Adolescent Stress: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions

by Emma Adam, Professor of Human Development and Social Policy and IPR Fellow, and Sarah Collier Villaume, Human Development and Social Policy Doctoral Student and IPR Graduate Research Assistant
Colloquium 2019
June 6, 2019

Matthew Desmond

Matthew Desmond, the Maurice P. During Professor of Sociology at Princeton University and author of the Pulitzer Prize winner Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, shared as part of the IPR@50 conference some of the latest results from his Eviction Lab, which created the first-ever national database of eviction records.

Public Policy Lecture Poverty, Race and Inequality 2019
June 6, 2019 - June 7, 2019

IPR@50 Anniversary Conference

IPR@50 was a year-long celebration that involved public lectures by IPR faculty, former PhD students, and others and culminated in a two-day conference on June 6–7, 2019. IPR’s 50th anniversary offered a unique moment to take stock of what we know about key research areas, to look at how IPR research has contributed to that knowledge base, and to chart a course for studying it in the years to come. 

Special Event 2019
February 20, 2019

Jocelyn Samuels: LGBT Rights: Threats and Opportunities

Jocelyn Samuels, the executive director of the LGBT-focused Williams Institute at UCLA’s School of Law, spoke about how social science research can have an impact on LGBT health and policy issues.

Public Policy Lecture 2019
November 7, 2018

Arthur C. Brooks

Arthur C. Brooks, former president of the conservative think tank the American Enterprise Institute, discussed how political polarization threatens not only the public discourse but America’s social fabric.

Public Policy Lecture 2018
April 26, 2018

Fay Lomax Cook

Fay Lomax Cook, then-assistant director of the National Science Foundation and IPR fellow and former director, spoke about the NSF’s “10 Big Ideas” regarding the future of work in America, including dealing with data collection, climate change, and advances in genetic science.

Public Policy Lecture 2018
March 9, 2018

Crime In Chicago: What Does The Research Tell Us?

Chicago has a national reputation for violence. Even though shooting deaths dropped in the city last year, 664 people still died from gun violence. Research from IPR experts not only explains some of the city's most enduring problems, but it also shows that it is possible to find viable solutions to combat the city's violence. Join IPR and the Union League of Chicago's Public Affairs Committee for presentations and discussion on what the research reveals about crime in Chicago.

Policy Research Briefing Education Policy 2018
February 16, 2017

Kathryn Edin

In her book, $2.00 A Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, Kathryn Edin illuminates a troubling trend: a low-wage labor market that increasingly fails to deliver a living wage, and a growing but hidden landscape of survival strategies among America's extreme poor.

Read the IPR story about this event.

Public Policy Lecture 2017
February 16, 2017

Research Training Institute on Cluster-Randomized Trials

Faculty Organizers: Larry Hedges and Elizabeth Tipton

This two-week, in-depth training institute covers a range of specific topics in the design, implementation, and analysis of data for use in cluster-randomized trials, allowing researchers to account for the group effects of teachers and classrooms when measuring an intervention’s effects on individual student achievement. Support comes from the National Center for Education Research, housed in the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences.

Workshops and Training Education Policy 2017
May 17, 2016

D.C. Research Briefing: Ready for School, Ready for Life

Over the years, many efforts have been made to improve early-learning environments as means to boost Americans' job and life prospects. Several new studies are fueling thought-provoking ideas as to what policymakers, parents, and researchers should consider when retooling early-education policies.

Policy Research Briefing 2016
December 4, 2015

Madam President? Women Leaders: Their Potential, Their Challenges

Join our faculty experts as they examine the ways in which women do, and do not differ, from men in terms of leadership; discuss interventions that increased the number of women in leadership roles; and assess how women might better make themselves heard in public discourse.
Policy Research Briefing 2015
May 19, 2015

Education in the Digital Age

Will high-tech tools improve or exacerbate existing inequities in education? Join our three panelists as they talk about their research on the impact of technology on learning.
Policy Research Briefing 2015
August 9, 2010 - August 13, 2010

Research Training Institute for Quasi-Experimental Design and Analysis

Faculty Organizers: Thomas D. Cook and William Shadish

The Summer Research Training Institute for Quasi-Experimental Design and Analysis was designed to increase the national capacity of researchers to develop and conduct rigorous evaluations of the impact of education interventions. The original workshops were co-organized by Thomas Cook, Joan and Sarepta Harrison Chair Emeritus in Ethics and Justice and Professor Emeritus, Northwestern University, and William Shadish, Professor, Founding Faculty, and Chair, Psychological Sciences Section University of California, Merced (now deceased).

Workshops and Training Education Policy; Quantitative Methods for Policy Research 2010
July 25, 2010 - August 6, 2010

Research Training Institute on Cluster-Randomized Trials 2010

Faculty Organizers: Larry Hedges

This two-week, in-depth training institute covered a range of specific topics in the design, implementation, and analysis of data for use in cluster-randomized trials, allowing researchers to account for the group effects of teachers and classrooms when measuring an intervention’s effects on individual student achievement. Support comes from the National Center for Education Research, housed in the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences.

Workshops and Training Quantitative Methods for Policy Research; Education Policy 2010
July 7, 2008 - July 18, 2008

Research Training Institute on Cluster-Randomized Trials 2008

Faculty Organizers: Larry Hedges

This two-week, in-depth training institute covers a range of specific topics in the design, implementation, and analysis of data for use in cluster-randomized trials, allowing researchers to account for the group effects of teachers and classrooms when measuring an intervention’s effects on individual student achievement. Support comes from the National Center for Education Research, housed in the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences.

Workshops and Training Education Policy; Quantitative Methods for Policy Research 2008