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Urban Policy and Community Development

Over the past decades, globalization, immigration, technology, crime, and other social, economic, and political forces have radically altered urban life. Faculty in this area attempt to understand the real-world sources and consequences of urban poverty and problems that cities and urban dwellers face, from education and housing to policing and segregation.

A Message From Lincoln Quillian, Program Chair

Image of Lincoln Quillian
IPR’s urban policy and community development faculty examine the shifting landscape of urban life, considering myriad issues related to today’s urban experience. Additionally, many IPR faculty work on projects that are closely tied to urban policy in areas such as education, housing, welfare reform, community policing, and performance measurement and rewards.

Working Papers

Recently published articles and working papers in this program area include:

Kyle Rozema and Max Schanzenbach. 2018. Good Cop, Bad Cop: Using Civilian Allegations to Predict Police Misconduct (WP-18-21).

William Evans, Craig Garthwaite, and Timothy Moore. 2018. Guns and Violence: The Enduring Impact of Crack Cocaine Markets on Young Black Males (WP-18-17).

Wesley G. Skogan. 2016. Stop-and-Frisk and Trust in Police in Chicago (WP-16-08).

All Papers

Faculty Experts

Political scientists, sociologists, education and social policy experts, and other social scientists come together to study topics associated with the urban landscape and its communities.

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News

Margaret Gordon
‘50 Years of Women’ at IPR: The Early Years

How does women’s fear of rape influence their behavior? Why did the ERA fail? What changes are women in the labor market making and how does their involvement affect them as mothers? IPR researchers studied these women’s issues, among many, in the first two decades.

Events

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Policy Brief: Predicting Police Misconduct

Police shootings have captured the public’s attention in recent years, leading to protests and a lack of trust in the police. In Predicting Police Misconduct, IPR associate Max Schanzenbach identifies how civilian allegations can help reduce the gravest incidents by predicting which police officers pose the highest risk for serious misconduct.

Download the brief