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With less than two weeks to go until November 3, the 2020 election will be historic on many levels. Amid this extraordinary election cycle, IPR political experts have pivoted their research to offer fresh insights into what voters think, the prospects of female candidates, partisanship and party polarization, how voters understand campaign promises, presidential leadership and democracy, and the appeal of economic success to working-class voters.

Faculty Spotlight
Hannes Schwandt

IPR economist Hannes Schwandt studies how economics can impact peoples’ wellbeing, including the way economic shocks impact people's lives and the connection between pollution and disease.
Research News
Gaining Research Skills During COVID-19

For more than 20 years, IPR has hired undergraduate students to conduct research with faculty in its summer program. Amid the pandemic, students and their faculty mentors adapted to a rapidly changing research environment, pivoting to mostly online work.
'Election Day' Might Turn into 'Election Week'

More Americans have signed up to vote by mail than ever before. How might this impact the election? A survey by IPR political scientist James Druckman reveals that counting a record number of mail-in votes could turn an early Trump lead into an eventual Biden win.
SAGA Tutoring Program Supports Students

IPR economist Jonathan Guryan has assessed the sucess of the SAGA tutoring program, which may be a resource for students who have fallen behind during COVID-19. 
Recent IPR Faculty Research

Read recent IPR research including studies looking at how therapists can help with unexplained illness, the link between household water insecurity and water governance, and immigration and entrepreneurship. 
Faculty Opinion

"We scientists and healthcare providers have earned the distrust of patients of color from long-standing experiences of racism in research and healthcare delivery."
Working Papers

Point of Reference: A Multi-Sited Exploration of African Migration and Fertility in France (WP-20-09)
Julia Behrman and Abigail Weitzman

Does Affective Polarization Undermine Support for Democratic Norms? (WP-20-10) 
Jon Kingzette, James Druckman, Samara Klar, Yanna Krupnikov, Matthew Levendusky, and John Barry Ryan

Using Social and Behavioral Science to Support COVID-19 Pandemic Response (WP-20-11) 
Jay Van Bavel, Robb Willer, James Druckman, Eli Finkel, et al.
More Working Papers
Upcoming Events
IPR's events for the fall 2020 quarter will be held online. Registration is required to join. You can always find the latest event information by visiting our online calendar. 

Oct. 26: "How the Punishment of Black Girls Affects Our Democracy" 
Sally Nuamah (IPR/ SESP)

Nov. 2: "College for All: Opportunity or Obligation? How Low-SES Students Respond to the Call to College"
James Rosenbaum (IPR/ SESP) and Ashley Uphoff (IPR Research Study Coordinator) 

Nov. 9: "IPR 2020 Election Panel"
Martin Eichenbaum (Economics/ IPR), Laurel Harbridge-Yong (IPR/ Political Science), Erik Nisbet (Communications/ IPR), Chloe Thurston (IPR/ Political Science), and moderated by Daniel Galvin (IPR/ Political Science)

Nov. 16: "How Stress Gets Under the Skin: A Neuroimmune Network Perspective"
Robin Nusslock (IPR/ Psychology) 

Nov. 23: "TBA"
Jordan Gans-Morse (Political Science/ IPR)
More IPR Events
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Northwestern University

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