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IPR faculty experts Cynthia Coburn and Kirabo Jackson were among 15 scholars elected to the National Academy of Education (NAEd) in recognition of their outstanding contributions to education research.

Research News
What Drives Native American Poverty?

Across the United States, 1 in 3 Native Americans live in poverty. IPR sociologist Beth Redbird recently presented her research into the causes of that poverty in a talk co-sponsored with the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research, where she is also a fellow.

 

Faculty Spotlight:
Molly Schnell


IPR economist Molly Schnell was drawn to economics because of its policy relevance. "Rather than focusing on just interest rates or GDP, economics is a toolbox that can be used to answer a range of questions that can be very impactful for people's lives,” Schnell said.

 
For Agrarian Communities,
Climate Change's
Effects Are Personal


A new working paper from IPR sociologist Julia Behrman looks at some of the far-reaching impacts of climate change. When agrarian communities in Malawi experience extreme drought and rainfall, her study shows that women marry and have children sooner.
New Faculty Research: Protest Movements, Crime 'Hot Spots,' and Youth Sports Programs

New research from IPR faculty sheds light on a wide range of topics, including how anger in protest movements can be counter-productive, how identifying "hot spots" for crime can lead to better law enforcement, and the effects of sports programs on young people in developing countries.
 

"...It is important to look back at the data, to understand the context of policy decisions, and to not overlook alternative forms of proactive policing that are less intrusive in the lives of innocent people.” 
 
—Charles Manski, with co-author Daniel Nagin of Carnegie Mellon University
Stop-and-frisk can be an effective crime-fighting tool, at the right time and place
The Washington Post
Awards and Honors
Emma Adam was named a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science for her outstanding contributions to the field of developmental psychobiology of stress and sleep.

Celeste Watkins-Hayes' book Remaking a Life was nominated as a finalist for the 2020 PROSE Award in the social sciences section by the Association of American Publishers.

Sally Nuamah received the Clarence Stone Scholar Award from the American Political Science Association’s Urban Politics Section, and won a 2020 PROSE Award in education practice for How Girls Achieve.

Larry Hedges' article “How to Do a Systematic Review” was among the Annual Reviews’ most downloaded of 2019.
 
Sandy Waxman co-edited the inaugural issue of the just-launched Annual Review of Developmental Psychology.

Numerous IPR faculty were honored for their achievements at Northwestern University's annual Faculty Recognition Dinner.
 
More Awards And Honors
Working Papers
The Federal Reserve’s Current Framework for Monetary Policy: A Review and Assessment (WP-19-19) by Janice Eberly, James Stock, and Jonathan Wright

Does Vocational Education Work? Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Mongolia (WP-19-20) by Erica Field, Leigh Linden, Ofer Malamud, Daniel Rubenson, and Shing-Yi Wang

Precise or Imprecise Probabilities? Evidence From Survey Response on Late-Onset Dementia (WP-19-21) by Pamela Giustinelli, Charles F. Manski, and Francesca Molinari
More Working Papers
Upcoming Events
March 2: "Operationalizing Research to Improve Health Inequities: The Collective Power of One Northwestern" by Melissa Simon (Feinberg/IPR)

March 9: "The Economic Consequences of Bankruptcy Reform" by Matthew Notowidigdo (IPR/Economics)

 
More IPR Events
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Institute for Policy Research
Northwestern University

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