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Three new fellows, (from left) Tabitha Bonilla, Sally Nuamah, and Molly Schnell, are joining Northwestern's Institute for Policy Research (IPR) in September, adding their expertise in political science, education policy,  
and economics to IPR’s interdisciplinary research programs.

Faculty Highlights
SURA Program Gives Undergraduates Practical Research Experience

This summer, 24 undergraduates were matched with IPR faculty to work on research projects exploring topics such as early math education, gender and racial bias in children, the impact of stress on pregnancy, and the constitutions of Tribal Nations.
Social policy expert Tabitha Bonilla studies public opinion and the everyday consumption of politics, focusing on how communication influences voters and policies. 
 
Research News
Networks and Police Misconduct

A study by sociologist Andrew Papachristos and his colleagues looking at the records of Chicago police officers named in complaints from 2007–15 found that officers with a greater proportion of colleagues with use-of-force complaints were more likely to be involved in a similar complaint. 
 
Patient Care Under Uncertainty 

In his new book, Patient Care Under Uncertainty, econometrician Charles F. Manski applies the tools of economics to medical decision making, showing how uncertainty influences every stage, from risk analysis to treatment, and how this can be reasonably confronted.
Methods Workshops Improve Research Capacity

IPR faculty-led trainings SIBASS
and CRT allowed more than 60 researchers from across the United States to hone their methodological skills and improve their capacity for conducting rigorous social science and education research.
September Research 
Highlights Recent
Faculty Studies


Check out some of the latest research from IPR faculty researchers, including how supportive parenting can protect children living in poverty and how drug markets affect opioid prescriptions. 
More IPR Research News
"In order for a parent to be able to express concern about racial bias to their child, they have to be willing to recognize it in themselves. ... If they are talking to their child about the existence of the incidents that are going on in the world, their child is probably more likely to go out in the world and recognize for themselves what racial bias looks like." 
Working Papers
Why Replications Do Not Fix the Reproducibility Crisis: A Model and Evidence From a Large-Scale Vignette Experiment
(WP-19-04) Adam Berinksy, James Druckman, and Teppei Yamamoto

Meta-Analysis For Medical Decisions 
(WP-19-05) Charles F. Manski

Is the Energy Demand of the Developing Brain Related to Lifetime Obesity Risk? (WP-19-06) Christopher Kuzawa and Clancy Blair
More Working Papers
Upcoming Events
October 7:  "Adolescent Stress: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions" by Emma Adam (IPR/SESP) and Sarah Collier-Villaume (SESP Doctoral Student) 

October 9:  "Estimating Replicability: Prospective and Retrospective Approaches" by Blake McShane (Kellogg) 

October 14:  "The Impact of Car Pollution on Infant and Child Health: Evidence from Emissions Cheating" by Hannes Schwandt (IPR/SESP) 

October 21:  "Race in the Machine" by Quincy Thomas Stewart 
(IPR/Sociology)

October 23:  "Empowering Electoral Reform: Quantifying Gerrymandering via Multi-Objective Optimization and Statistical Analysis" by Wendy Tam Cho (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

October 28:  "Beyond Detention: Key Findings from the Northwestern Juvenile Project" by Linda Teplin (Feinberg/IPR) 

October 30:  "Designing Research to Maximize Impact on Policy Decisions and on Practice" by Ronald Ackerman (Feinberg/IPR)
More IPR Events
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Institute for Policy Research
Northwestern University

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Evanston, IL 60208

ipr@northwestern.edu | 847.491.3395