Currently, 28 percent of the entire U.S. population is either an immigrant or a child born in the United States to an immigrant, according to the 2018 Current Population Survey. IPR faculty researchers have long studied issues related to immigrants to the United States, including effects on education, employment, public opinion, and healthcare.


Pablo Boczkowski, media scholar and IPR associate, has followed the transformation of online journalism from the early days of news websites in the 1990s to social media’s influence on news consumption today.
Infographic: Schools that Value Diversity Could Have Health Benefits for Students of Color

IPR health psychologists Edith Chen and Greg Miller with former postdoc Cynthia Levine find that emphasizing diversity in schools is linked to better health for students
of color.
Effects of Testosterone on Female Twins

IPR economist David Figlio, anthropologist Christopher Kuzawa, and research associate Krzysztof Karbownik find that women with twin brothers are more likely to do worse in school and earn less money compared with twins who are both female. 
Children Show Race, Gender Bias

A study co-authored by IPR researchers Danielle Perszyk and Sandra Waxman provides strong and consistent evidence of bias at the intersection of race and gender in 4-year-old American children. 
"Being behind bars while awaiting trial had profound negative repercussions, and they were borne disproportionately by low-income people
and by black people.
"
Celebrating IPR@50
Register for the
IPR@50 Conference


Register now for "IPR@50: The Next 50 Years of Policy Research." The conference will take place June 6–7 on the Evanston Campus, with a series of thematic panels featuring IPR faculty researchers and a keynote by Princeton sociologist Matthew Desmond, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.
IPR@50: The Third Decade

In the 1990s, IPR sent deeper roots into social science research. Its third decade saw a name change that better reflected the Institute’s identity and ambitions and its commitment to cross-disciplinary research.
Awards and Honors
James Rosenbaum received the Elizabeth G. Cohen Distinguished Career in Applied Sociology of Education Award from the American Educational Research Association in April.
More Awards and Honors
Working Papers
Good Cop, Bad Cop: Using Civilian Allegations to Predict Police Misconduct
(WP-18-21) by Kyle Rozema and Max Schanzenbach

The Evidence for Motivated Reasoning in Climate Change Preference Formation
(WP-18-22) James Druckman and Mary McGrath

The Intersection of Racial and Partisan Discrimination: Evidence from a Correspondence Study of Four-Year Colleges
(WP-18-23) by James Druckman and Richard Shafranek
More Working Papers
Upcoming Events
April 15: "Shifting Allegiances? Urban-Rural Linkages, Ethnic Identification, and Political Behavior in Kenya" by Rachel Beatty Riedl (IPR/Political Science)

April 15: "Contract Enforcement and Productive Efficiency: Evidence from the Bidding and Renegotiation of Power Contracts in India" by Nicholas Ryan (Yale University)

April 19: "It Takes Money to Make MPs: New Evidence from 150 Years of British Campaign Spending" by Julia Cagé (SciencesPo, Paris)

April 22: "On Our Watch: Addressing Mortality Among Infants, Children, and Adolescents in the U.S." by Matthew Davis (Lurie Children's Hospital)

April 25: Joint Economics/IPR Seminar by Dina Pomeranz (University of Zurich)

April 29: "Assessing the Relevance of IES-Funded Goal 3 and 4 Studies to Important Policy Populations" by Elizabeth Tipton (IPR/Statistics)
More IPR Events
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Institute for Policy Research
Northwestern University

2040 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208

ipr@northwestern.edu | 847.491.3395