Lincoln Quillian

Professor of Sociology (on leave) | Chair of IPR's Program on Urban Policy and Community Development


Social demographer Lincoln Quillian is interested in social stratification, race and ethnicity, urban sociology, and quantitative research methods. Most of his research has focused on how social structure and group demography influence inequality, intergroup attitudes, and neighborhood segregation. He has published articles on the effect of the relative size of racial minority groups on racial attitudes, patterns of migration that underlie segregation on the basis of race and income in American cities, correspondence between audit measures of discrimination and survey measures of prejudice, racial segregation in adolescent friendship networks, and the influence of racial stereotypes on perceptions of neighborhood crime levels.

Recently, he has published on how multiple forms of segregation combine to produce neighborhood poverty concentration. These projects have appeared as publications in a number of journals in sociology, demography, and social psychology. His 2012 paper, "Segregation and Poverty Concentration: The Role of Three Segregations," won four best article awards from sections of the American Sociological Association.

Quillian directs Northwestern’s Applied Quantitative Research Methods Workshop.  In 2012-13, he was a visiting fellow at the Russell Sage Foundation.

Current Research

The Discrimination Meta-Analysis Project. This project aims to better understand discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities in labor markets around the world through a meta-analysis of audit and correspondence studies of discrimination.  The project addresses questions such as: (1) What is the prevalence of discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities in hiring across countries in the world?  (2) How do rates of hiring discrimination vary across target groups and economic sectors?  (3)  How are national conditions and policies associated with levels of race and ethnic discrimination in hiring?  This project is supported by the Russell Sage Foundation.

Household Migration and System Dynamics of Residential Segregation. Quillian is applying models that consider migration as a process of matching between individuals and neighborhoods, with multiple dimensions of households and neighborhoods governing the match produced. He is exploring the use of these models to better understand the factors that produce racial and economic segregation across American neighborhoods.

U.S.-France Comparisons of Economic and Ethnic Segregation. With Hugues LaGrange of Sciences Po in Paris, Quillian is analyzing levels and patterns of socioeconomic and ethnic segregation in large cities in the United States and France.

Selected Publications

Quillian, L., and J. Ludwig.  2015.  Housing and neighborhoods and a new national household panelJournal of Economic and Social Measurement 40:  283-314.

Quillian, L.  2015.  A comparison of traditional and discrete-choice approaches to the analysis of residential mobility and locational attainmentThe Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 660(1): 240-260.

Quillian, L.  2014. Does segregation create winners and losers?  Residential segregation and inequality in educational attainmentSocial Problems 61(3): 402-426.

Quillian, L. 2012. Segregation and poverty concentration: The role of three segregations. American Sociological Review 77(3): 354–79. Winner of the 2014 Jane Addams Award of the American Sociological Association (ASA) Community and Urban Sociology Section; the 2013 ASA Award for Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship in Population; and 2013 Outstanding Article Awards from both the Mathematical Sociology and Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility sections of the ASA.

Quillian, L., and D. Pager. 2010. Estimating risk: Stereotype amplification and the perceived risk of criminal victimization. Social Psychology Quarterly 73(1): 79–104

Quillian, L., and R. Redd. 2009. The friendship networks of multiracial adolescents. Social Science Research 38(2): 279–95.

Quillian, L., and R. Redd. 2008. Can social capital explain persistent racial poverty gaps? In The Colors of Poverty, ed. A. Chih Lin and D. R. Harris, 170–97. New York: Russell Sage.

Quillian, L. 2006. New approaches to understanding racial prejudice and discrimination. Annual Review of Sociology 32: 299–328.

Pager, D., and L. Quillian. 2005. Walking the talk? What employers say versus what they do. American Sociological Review 70(3): 355–80.

Quillian, L. 2003. How long are exposures to poor neighborhoods? The long-term dynamics of entry and exit from poor neighborhoods. Population Research and Policy Review 22(3): 221–49.

Quillian, L., and D. Pager. 2001. Black neighbors, higher crime? The role of racial stereotypes in evaluations of neighborhood crime. American Journal of Sociology 107(3): 717–67.

Quillian, L. 1999. Migration patterns and the growth of high-poverty neighborhoods, 1970–1990. American Journal of Sociology 105(1): 1–37. 

Quillian, Lincoln. 1995. Prejudice as a response to perceived group threat: Population composition and anti-immigrant and racial prejudice in Europe. American Sociological Review 60: 586–611.